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Smoking Dorini Dreamy Martini

Smoking Dorini Dreamy Martini


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Saunders created this drink for Dori Bryant, "a whiskey-drinking lady." This recipe differs from the classic "Smoky Martini" because she added Pernod.

Ingredients

  • ½ ounce Laphroaig 10–year-old Scotch
  • 5 drops Pernod or other anise-flavored liqueurs

Recipe Preparation

  • Holding a large (preferably 1") cube of ice in the palm of your hand, use the back of a stirring spoon to crack it into large pieces; place in a mixing glass. Repeat with enough ice to fill glass. Add vodka, Scotch, and Pernod and, using a bar spoon, rapidly stir 50 times in a circular motion (the outside of the shaker will become very cold and frosty).

  • Strain martini through a Hawthorne strainer (or a large slotted spoon) into a chilled Nick and Nora glass. Strain any excess cocktail into a sidecar set over ice (or a small glass in a bowl of ice).

  • Using a small knife, remove a 1" piece of peel from lemon; it should be stiff enough to provide some resistance (a little white pith is okay). Twist peel over drink to express oils, then rub around rim of glass. Float peel, yellow side up, in martini.

Recipe by Audrey Saunders, Pegu Club, New York CityReviews Section

A New Origin of Species: The Cocktail, Classified

THE English language badly needs a word to describe the thing that bartenders do. The important work of putting together spirits and flavorings in the combinations we call cocktails deserves a decent name, but there isn't one. ''Mixology'' is the best of a bad lot, a coinage that harks back to the overripe, mock-elevated style used by writers like H. L. Mencken, Herbert Asbury and Lucius Beebe, for whom drinks were inevitably ''libations,'' ''tinctures'' or ''potions.''

''Mixology'' is probably the right word, though, for Gary Regan's ''Joy of Mixology'' (Clarkson Potter, $30), a cocktail history, bartender's guide and recipe book that takes the scientific aspect of drink making, the ''ology,'' very seriously. Mr. Regan, who runs a Web site, www.ardentspirits.com, and has written books on bourbon and the martini, takes a highly unusual taxonomic approach to cocktail-making. Like Linnaeus, he surveys the teeming, seemingly chaotic population of mixed drinks and imposes order by dividing them into families, each with its own distinctive features that make it different from the rest.

In Mr. Regan's tidy universe of drink, the cosmopolitan belongs to the same species as the margarita and the sidecar: it is a New Orleans sour, which, along with international sours, sparkling sours, and squirrel sours (so named by the author because they rely on nut-based liqueurs like Frangelico or amaretto), make up a genus of cocktails united by their use of sour citrus juices sweetened with sugar or syrups. The idea is that once novice bartenders grasp the underlying formula of a drink family and the flavors appropriate to it, they can introduce variations, as Mr. Regan did when he tried substituting crème de noyaux, a pink, almond-flavored liqueur, for triple sec in some New Orleans sour recipes, and cut the sweetness of the liqueur with club soda. An entirely new category resulted -- the squirrel sour.

Not all drinks fit neatly into the scheme. Mr. Regan has invented a catchall Orphan family to deal with 64 cocktails that defy categorization. These include old-timers like the Sazerac (whiskey and Peychaud's bitters) and newfangled show-off drinks like the Dreamy Dorini Smoking Martini (vodka, Laphroaig whiskey and Pernod, with a lemon twist).

But most cocktails find bona fide categories. The manhattan belongs to the whiskey and brandy species of French-Italian cocktails, all of which use French or Italian vermouth. The negroni and the martini belong to the gin and vodka species. I now understand the relationship between the fuzzy navel and Sex on the Beach. The former, because it calls for orange juice, is a Florida highball. The latter, made with cranberry juice, is a New England highball, like the Cape Codder and the sea breeze. It all makes sense. Just consult the charts in the book.

In his structural approach to the cocktail, Mr. Regan follows in the footsteps of the great David A. Embury, a Manhattan lawyer who, in his off hours, wrote what many drink experts regard as the best cocktail book ever. The book, ''The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks,'' first published in 1948, brought intellectual rigor and plain English to a subject that badly needed both. Just how Mr. Embury acquired his knowledge remains mysterious. For many years he served as head of a national organization that represented college fraternities. That might be a clue, and his training as a lawyer perhaps explains his mania for organizing recipes by drink type.

Occasionally Mr. Embury could get carried away. He explained, offhandedly and unhelpfully, that 'ɾssentially the sidecar is nothing but a daiquiri with brandy in the place of rum and Cointreau in the place of sugar syrup or orgeat.'' Well, all right. And ''Romeo and Juliet'' is the same as ''Two Gentlemen of Verona,'' if you delete the tragic ending and make Juliet a man. Over all, though, Mr. Embury broke new ground by grouping like with like and by encouraging readers to use his insights and create their own drinks.

Mr. Regan begins his book with a lively history of the cocktail. It includes two facts, one momentous, one trivial, that caught my eye. In discussing the evolution of the mixed drink in the United States, Mr. Regan zeroes in on a striking development in the late 19th century: the introduction of vermouth. It is vermouth that eased the way from the proto-cocktails of the early 19th century, which were little more than gin or whiskey with sugar and bitters, to modern masterpieces like the martini and the manhattan. This was big. By Prohibition, more than half the cocktails being made in the United States called for vermouth, said Albert Stevens Crockett, the author of ''Old Waldorf Bar Days.''

Why? Mr. Regan does not address the question, but I have a few thoughts. Vermouth made possible a new level of flavor complexity by allowing wine and spirits to commingle in the same glass with ice. It brokered the agreement, so to speak. Old bar books included all sorts of recipes for hot punches that mixed, say, brandy and port, and for cold drinks, called cobblers, that used wine and flavorings over crushed ice. But not until vermouth came on the scene did wines and spirits find common ground.

The best silly fact in ''The Joy of Mixology'' concerns a drink, if it can be called a drink, for which I have expressed nothing but contempt. It's the jelly (or Jell-O) shot, a quivering alcohol-spiked blob of gelatin, usually in a gaudy color and usually headed for the gaping maw of a barely legal customer. I stand corrected. The jelly shot dates to the mid-19th century, and it has a genteel pedigree. Our ancestors enjoyed turning flavorful punches into a chilled jelly, to be served in slices on a warm evening. Jerry Thomas included several recipes in ''How to Mix Drinks, or the Bon-Vivant's Companion,'' the first cocktail book, published in 1862. He also appended a warning. ''Many persons,'' he wrote, ''have been tempted to partake so plentifully of it as to render them somewhat unfit for waltzing or quadrilling after supper.''


Going 10 Rounds With Award-Winning Bartender Kenta Goto

The talented New York bartender tackles our speed round of questions.

Noah Rothbaum

Courtesy Bar Goto

What do you like to drink after a shift? “A Scotch and a beer.”

What is the all-time best dive bar jukebox song? ““Gimme Shelter” by the Rolling Stones.”

Name the first good drink you ever drank and where you had it. “The Dreamy Dorini Smoking Martini and Earl Grey MarTEAni. I had both of them at Pegu Club.”

What book on cocktails, spirits or food is your go-to resource?The Flavor Bible. It’s a book that describes how ingredients can be combined to create great flavor. I like to use it as a resource when I’m working on new cocktails.”

Name the toughest cocktail that was the hardest one for you to master? “For me, the Bloody Mary has been the toughest to master. That’s mostly because it’s one of my favorite cocktails to drink, so I am particular about the taste and balance being just right.”

Ever appropriate to make a Vodka Martini? “Yes, but only if it’s a good one!”

What’s your favorite cocktail and food pairing? “The Bamboo cocktail and charcuterie. And a Manhattan and chocolate.”

What drink are you most proud of creating? “The Umami Mary I serve at Bar Goto. This is not a typical Bloody Mary. To me it is the ultimate Japanese Bloody Mary. It incorporates Japanese ingredients (shitake and dashi) into a drink that usually has a different flavor profile.”

What’s your favorite shot-and-a-beer combination? “Tecate and Fortaleza Blanco Tequila.”

What is the one tool that you always make sure to pack when you’re traveling for business? “A set of measuring spoons. I often create my recipes using teaspoons in addition to ounces. This allows me to be more precise and to get even closer to the flavor I’m looking for.”

Kenta Goto is the owner of New York’s Bar Goto and was named American Bartender of the Year at the 2011 Tales of the Cocktails conference.


There are as many different recipes for this drink as there are varieties of apple and brands of apple liqueur: this one was popular in the UK during the Noughties.

Nutrition:

There are approximately 201 calories in one serving of Apple Martini (with apple schnapps).

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Amazon.com Review

Mr. Boston Holiday Cocktails helps you get the festivities rolling with seventy-eight celebratory recipes, collected from the best cocktail creators in the country. Illustrated with mouth-watering, full-color photographs, these recipes range from classic (Hot Buttered Rum) to trendy (Dreamy Dorini Smoking Martini) to surprising and unique (Lancaster On Hudson, with bourbon and apple butter). You'll appreciate the Trade Secrets sprinkled throughout the book for preparing and serving the perfect drink, along with Mr. Boston's attention to the purity and flavor of fresh ingredients in your cocktails.

With visually appealing, eminently sippable, crowd-pleasing cocktail recipes for every possible occasion, Mr. Boston Holiday Cocktails offers simple instructions for

  • Hot and steamy drinks to warm up long winter nights or apr?s ski
  • Rich and creamy nogs for Christmas and New Year's
  • Highly spirited drinks with cool heft for hot parties
  • Perfect punches for when you'd rather be mixing with your guests than tending the bar

So, send out the invitations! With Mr. Boston Holiday Cocktails by your side, you are ready to party, with recipes and serving ideas that will enhance your holiday entertaining and make you the toast-or should we say, host-of the town. Needless to say, it's also the perfect gift for a friend.

Recipe Excerpts from Mr. Boston: Holiday Cocktails

From the Inside Flap

Mr. Boston Holiday Cocktails helps you get the festivities rolling with celebratory recipes from the best cocktail creators in the country. Recipes range from the classic Hot Buttered Rum to the au courant Dreamy Dorini Smoking Martini to the modern and unique Lancaster-on-Hudson, with bourbon whiskey and apple butter.

Cocktails with seasonal ingredients

Rich and creamy nogs and flips

Every recipe has been carefully composed with Mr. Boston's attention to the purity and flavor of fresh ingredients in your cocktails.

"Trade Secrets" throughout the book reveal professional techniques for preparing and serving the perfect drink, from keeping punch cold for hours without diluting it to making real grenadine at home. With top-shelf advice from Mr. Boston, you can add that "how did they do that?" touch to your entertaining.

So, send out the invitations and start chipping the ice! With Mr. Boston Holiday Cocktails by your side, you are ready to party, with recipes and serving ideas that will enliven your holiday entertaining and make you the toast—or rather, the host—of the town.

From the Back Cover

Seasonal Sippers
to capture the flavor of the moment

Perfect Punches
for when you'd rather enjoy your guests than tend the bar

Hot & Steamy Drinks
to warm up long winter nights

Rich & Creamy Nogs & Flips
for merry celebrations

Highly Spirited Drinks
with cool heft for hot parties

About the Author

Anthony Giglio is the author of three editions of Mr. Boston, Cocktails in New York, and Food & Wine Magazine's Wine Guide 2009. He is the wine correspondent for CBS News Radio and guest host of Boston radio's daily Connoisseurs Corner Wine Report. He also teaches at the De Gustibus Cooking School at Macy's Herald Square, organizes corporate tastings, and leads wine tours of Italy.

Jim Meehan's career behind the bar spans fourteen years, from Madison, Wisconsin, to New York City. He compiled the latest recipes for Mr. Boston and Food & Wine's annual cocktail book, and he writes a monthly column for Sommelier Journal. He is a managing partner of PDT, a cocktail lounge in Manhattan's East Village.


Pernod - how to serve and in what??

I've recently discovered this liquer and like it quite a bit. I'd heard of it but never bothered to try it until recently. I have a bottle of it at home and served some to my brother in law who advised me to add a bit of water to cloudy it up apparently that's the traditional way of serving it.

Can anyone comment on this and other ways to serve this libation?? In addition, in what ought Pernod be served? Cordial glass, old fashioned, etc?? I'm a stickler for those types of things.

My favorite pre-dinner drink and or appetizer accompaniment (obviously depending on the food) is a vodka martini with pernod replacing the vermouth.

Obviously a little pernod goes a long way, so I like to make them very dry. add some blue cheese stuffed olives and I guarantee people will be HOUNDING you about how you made them.

Clicking the will recommend this comment to others.

Thanks. Yes, found that after posting as well as some other sites.

Nice one. Can you be more specific on the martini: shaken, stirred, rocks/not, etc??

On a Pernod martini, I think it would be a good idea to skip the olive garnish and use a lemon twist instead. Other than that, the details on making a martini are best left up to the drinker. As a cocktailian rule of thumb, drinks with eggs, fruit juice, or dairy products (including cream liqueurs like Bailey's) should be shaken in order to properly mix the ingredients, while clear cocktails should be stirred so they don't get overly diluted by the vigorous shaking, but if someone wants their martini shaken go right ahead.

There's a cocktail involving Pernod called the Dreamy Dorini Smoking Martini. Single-malt scotch purists may want to look the other way. As you surely have found by now, don't overdo it on the Pernod- three drops should be plenty.

1-1/2 oz Grey Goose vodka
1/2 oz Laphroaig 10-year single-malt scotch (or any other really smoky, peaty scotch you may have handy)
2 or 3 drops Pernod

Stir over ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon twist.

Well I am a scotch dinker, if not necessarily a connoisseur. I do cringe at the thought of doing something like that to my Laphroig, but for the good of chowhoundness I suppose a wee bit can be sacrificed.

>>On a Pernod martini, I think it would be a good idea to skip the olive garnish

I totally understand, to each his own, creative license, ad infinitum, etc, etc. That said, and I understand this makes a different drink but within the context of me mentioning the aforementioned drink, the olives (and whatever else is added) are what make it the kind of drink it is. Much like greeks sipping on ouzo while nibbling on just about anything that isn't nailed down first. The lemon makes it brighter, cleaner, etc. But with that flutter of anise mixed with some good blue style cheese and a good picholine. well that, my friend, is something altogether different. :)

Just a note: If you're emulating James Bond, you'll want a "stirred not shaken" Martini. Seriously. they've had it all wrong for all these years. Read the original 1956 edition (Pan Books) of Moon Raker! You'll be amazed (and forever citing this to prove it!

i drink it with ice and water.. most cafes will serve it to ou in this manner, both in the US and in France.. it's a Pastis type of drink popular in the South of France, as well as in Paris..

there are glasses, similar to the glasses for absinthe, which you'll find in some cafes, usually along with a small logoed pitcher of water offered on the side.. generally you dilute it much more than you would add water to a scotch to open it, probably a 2:1 ratio of water to pernod..

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My ex-wife used to love Pernod and 7-Up. It almost took on a day-glo green color. I don't like anise flavored things and substitutes for absinthe don't do it for me.


Mr. Boston Holiday Cocktails

From hot winter toddies to festive, refreshing punches, seasonal cocktails are all the rage in bars and at get-togethers. Now you can entertain your guests at home with drinks tailored for every holiday season, from the experts at "Mr. Boston," America's favorite drink-mixing guide. "Mr. Boston" has been the go-to manual for bartenders and spirits professionals since the repeal of the Prohibition, and with this collection of stylish all-new drink recipes, "Mr. Boston Holiday Cocktails" puts the expertise of world-class mixologists at your fingertips.

"Mr. Boston Holiday Cocktails" helps you get the festivities rolling with seventy-eight celebratory recipes, collected from the best cocktail creators in the country. Illustrated with mouth-watering, full-color photographs, these recipes range from classic (Hot Buttered Rum) to trendy (Dreamy Dorini Smoking Martini) to surprising and unique (Lancaster On Hudson, with bourbon and apple butter). You'll appreciate the Trade Secrets sprinkled throughout the book for preparing and serving the perfect drink, along with "Mr. Boston's" attention to the purity and flavor of fresh ingredients in your cocktails.

With visually appealing, eminently sippable, crowd-pleasing cocktail recipes for every possible occasion, "Mr. Boston Holiday Cocktails" offers simple instructions for
Hot and steamy drinks to warm up long winter nights or aprs skiRich and creamy nogs for Christmas and New Year'sHighly spirited drinks with cool heft for hot partiesPerfect punches for when you'd rather be mixing with your guests than tending the bar

So, send out the invitations With "Mr. Boston Holiday Cocktails" by your side, you are ready to party, with recipes and serving ideas that will enhance your holiday entertaining and make you the toast-or should we say, host-of the town. Needless to say, it's also the perfect gift for a friend.


Cuban Cocktails

Author : Ravi Derossi,Jane Danger,Alla Lapushchik
Publisher : Sterling Publishing (NY)
Release : 2015-10-06
ISBN : 9781454917502
Language : En, Es, Fr & De

From the celebrated Cuban bar Cienfuegos, owned by the co-owner of the award-winning Death & Co., dubbed America's Best Cocktail Bar, comes this spirited collection of 100 recipes that celebrate Cuba's rich cocktail history and culture. Featuring classics such as the Daiquiri, Floridita, and Papa Doble, as well as modern craft concoctions, including the Cienfuegos Shakes, Isla de Tesoros, and Jardin de Flores,Cuban Cocktails offers more than just a gathering of recipes. It captures the tropical elegance and unfiltered energy of Spanish Cuba, brimming with beautiful, evocative images of the drinks and the places where they came to life. Sidebars shed fascinating light on the country's legendary bars and nightclubs and the famous bartenders and entrepreneurs who ran them, while quotes and fun facts give a tantalizing taste of the once-forbidden Caribbean island.¡Bienvenidos a Cienfuegos!


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Smoky Martini Gin and Scotch Cocktail Recipe

  • The smoky martini is a very easy variation of the martini
  • There is no vermouth instead, this cocktail uses a dash of scotch to back up the gin
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Smoky Martini Recipe Leite's Culinaria

  • Directions Add the gin, dry vermouth, and whiskey to a shaker filled with ice
  • Shake sharply and strain into a chilled martini glass
  • Run the lemon zest along the rim.

Alton Brown's Favorite Martini Recipe Alton Brown

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  • Place some crushed ice into a wide-rimmed glass, and set aside
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Mexican Martini – Texas Monthly

  • In this recipe, smoky tequila squares off with salty olive brine while sweet orange liqueur plays mediator
  • Not particularly Mexican and not a martini, this is a damn tasty, fittingly weird gift

35 Best Classic and Modern Martini Recipes

  • According to cocktail history, the Martinez was most likely created before the martini
  • First printed in the 1887 edition of "The Bon Vivant's Companion: Or How to Mix Drinks" by "Professor" Jerry Thomas, this is a very old drink recipe.It has a gin base but is slightly sweeter than the martini

Recipes – Ole Smoky Moonshine

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  • Bourbon-Honey Glazed Ham Yummly
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Smoky Martini Recipe Vodka Drinks Ketel One Vodka

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  • Rinse old fashioned glass with scotch
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SMOKY MARTINI recipe Epicurious.com

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  • Submitted by pacnw1 Updated: October 02, 2015
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Martini Recipe Food Network Kitchen Food Network

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  • An hour before serving put a martini glass in the freezer
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One Smoky Martini Cocktail Recipe with Picture

  • The One Smoky Martini is a rustic martini made from Ketel One vodka, a rinse of Scotch whiskey and lemon, and served over ice in a rocks glass.

Smoking Dorini Dreamy Martini Recipe Bon Appétit

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  • Holding a large (preferably 1") cube of ice in the palm of your hand, use the back of a stirring spoon to crack it into large pieces place in a mixing glass
  • Repeat with enough ice to fill glass.

How To Make a Classic Martini Kitchn

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  • Build the drink: Place the gin or vodka and dry vermouth in a mixing glass
  • Stir and strain: Add cubed ice and stir for 30 seconds until the Martini is chilled
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Our Best Mezcal Cocktail Recipes

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  • Walking Stick cocktail Matt Taylor-Gross
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Black Forest Martini – Ole Smoky Moonshine

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Mezcal Margarita Feasting At Home

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Vodka Martini Recipe Smoky Martini Ketel One Vodka

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Capital appreciation

Visitors often overlook New Zealand’s capital in favour of Auckland or Queenstown, so when Max Veenhuyzen hit Wellington on the eve of the Rugby World Cup, he was chuffed to discover a port city that lives to eat and drink.

THE FINE PRINT
GETTING THERE Air New Zealand has daily direct flights to Wellington from Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane.
EAT & DRINK Ancestral
31-33 Courtenay Pl, +64 4 801 8867.
Arbitrageur
125 Feath­erston St, +64 4 499 5530.
Buenos Aires Tango Bistro
210a Left Bank Arcade (off Cuba Mall), +64 4 803 3950.
Hashigo Zake
25 Taranaki St, +64 4 384 7300.
Hippopotamus
Museum Hotel, Level 3, 90 Cable St, +64 4 802 8935.
La Boca Loca 19 Park Rd, Miramar, +64 4 388 2451.
The Larder
cnr Darlington & Camperdown rds, Miramar, +64 4 891 0354.
The Library Upstairs, 53 Courtenay Pl, +64 4 382 8593.
Logan Brown
Cnr Vivian & Cuba sts, +64 4 801 5114.
Matterhorn
106 Cuba St, +64 4 384 3359.
Memphis Belle Coffee House
38 Dixon St, +64 4 212 6823
Mojo
Shed 13, 37 Customhouse Quay, Kumutoto Plaza, +64 4 385 3001.
Moore Wilson
Cnr Tory & College sts, +64 4 384 9906.
Motel Bar 2 Forresters La, +64 4 384 9084
Roxy Cinema and Coco
5 Park Rd, Miramar, +64 4 388 5555.
Rumbles Wine Merchant
32 Waring Taylor St, +64 4 472 7045.
Vivo Enoteca Cucina
19 Edward St, +64 4 384 6400.
STAY Museum Hotel Classic deluxe rooms from $228. 90 Cable St, +64 4 802 8900.
Ohtel Studio rooms from $212. 66 Oriental Pde, +64 4 803 0600.


Watch the video: Martini (May 2022).